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NEWS & EVENTS

Online access to historical population reports

Article dated: 12-Sep-07

Under the banner of AHDS History, the UKDA is pleased to host the histpop web site. This web site is the public face of the three-year project called Online Historical Population Reports (OHPR) which was funded as part of the first JISC digitisation programme.

Histpop logo Histpop provides online access to digitised images of virtually all published population reports relating to Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1937, and a large number of downloadable tables containing the data from these reports. These population reports include all relevant census reports covering the 1801 to 1931 rounds of censuses (with some variation for Northern Ireland and Ireland). It also includes all the English and Scottish reports of the Registrars-General up until 1920. The content as a whole provides a wealth of textual and statistical material providing an in-depth view of the economy, society (through births, deaths and marriages) and medicine during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

These 200,000 pages of digital images are supported by numerous ancillary documents from The National Archives, critical essays and transcriptions of important legislation which provide an aid to understanding the context, content and creation of the collection.

The histpop web site is currently looking to expand into the second half of the twentieth centuries with the assistance of the General Register Office (Scotland) and the Central Statistical Office in Ireland. If any reader has surplus copies of population reports post-1931 which they would like to donate to the project, contact Matthew Woollard.




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